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5 Critical Questions to Ask When Moving in With Your First Roommates

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Three women moving in together

The situation is this: you’re officially renting your first place. No more close-quarter dorms or parents looking over your shoulder. You might be feeling a variety of emotions, depending on why you’re moving out. Anxiety, excitement, and sadness are all valid. On top of all that, you are looking for your first roommate. Don’t worry— you’re not alone, even if you’re moving out only after your freshman year of college! In fact, you’re in good company. According to a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average age of people first moving out is 19.

One of the most important things, besides remembering to pay rent, is getting along with your roommates.

Whether they’re people you’ve known for years, or someone you are just meeting now, chances are you don’t really know all of the ins and out of living with them. Who will buy the toilet paper? Who washes the dishes?

Here is a list of questions to ask your roommates when moving in together!  

Which roommate buys the paper products? 

As silly as it may seem, this is an important question to ask! You don’t realize how much toilet paper, paper towels, or tissues you may use. The last one is especially important if you have allergies. Last year, the average person spent $120 annually on paper products! 

You have to be prepared if you don’t want to buy your own stock every week or so. If the roommates are already set up, send them a text if you can, or learn when you get there. But if everyone’s newly coming together, have a discussion with your roommates and decide on what sounds good for you! It might be that everyone buys their own stock. Or it could be whoever’s out just buys it! Maybe everybody chips in! It’s up to you and your group. While you’re out, don’t forget to get plastic wrap and foil, too! 

Do we want to share dishes? 

This is another thing that depends on if you’re all coming together for the first time, or moving into an already established house. If you can’t get a hold of the people you’re moving in with, it’s smart to have two full sets for yourself. Then, you can wash and alternate just in case. If you’re moving in with a whole new group, however, it’s important to convene on this. This way, you may be able to get a larger set of dishes for cheaper with everyone chipping in. When getting dishes, however, you also have to remember to get kitchen utensils and appliances, if they’re not included. It’s probably not reasonable for everyone to have their own toasters, but it might make sense for everyone to have their own spatulas.

Who pays for WiFi? 

Considering a student’s reliance on the internet, you need to know who the WiFi will be under. If you’re moving into an already established household, it’s easy! Just learn who pays for it and make sure to pay them your share every month. If you’re moving in with a whole new group, you have to sit down and decide who will pay for it. Be on the lookout: if you already have a phone plan, you might be able to get a good deal on an internet plan too. 

Do we want to share food? 

You don’t want to be the person stealing food from your roommates, after all! If you’re with friends, you might feel comfortable sharing food. However, if you’re moving in with strangers or acquaintances, you might not. Roommates might want to share some items, like spices or baking products. Things like meat, yogurt, or cheese might be a little too much to share. Similarly, you might want to figure out if you want to cook together, especially if you’re with friends. This is important to know not only for budgeting, but for knowing what times you can use the kitchen! 

What furniture do we need?

Again, your response will change if you’re moving in with a pre-established group or a new one! Pictures from the landlord should answer most of the questions, but it’s important to make sure the pictures are up to date! If there is no furniture, Ikea and Target are great options for new cheap furniture. But if you’re on a bit of a budget, don’t worry! There are plenty of options on Facebook Marketplace or at local thrift stores.

Figure out what you need for common areas like living rooms, and keep in touch about what you find. 

Moving into a new place for the first time is an exciting experience, but it can also be terrifying. Despite that, there’s definitely no reason to panic. Just keep these questions in mind, and you’ll be ready to take on the world!

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