fbpx
Connect with us

Spotlight

Meet Cate Luzio: CEO of Luminary, A Female-Focused Collaboration Company

Published

on

Source: Cate Luzio

Cate Luzio is the founder and CEO of Luminary, New York City’s leading collaboration space for women and women-identified. At Luminary, Luzio invests in women while empowering them in the workforce.

Keeping women in the workforce is important to Luzio. Luzio and her team at Luminary work together to create a space where women across many industries can expand their professional development and networks.

For three years in a row, American Banker recognized Luzio on their Top 25 Women to Watch. She has over 20 years of experience in financial services and she hopes to use her expertise to help guide other women with the community and platform Luminary has become.

Luminary is a female-focused and forward-looking company that ultimately ensures you “We Are in This Together”.

  1. You have over 20 years of experience in financial services, how did your past experience lead you to start your own company?

My past experience really led me to start Luminary. I spent many years in senior leadership roles, building and growing global teams, and managing large P&Ls.

Most of my free time was devoted to developing, coaching and mentoring talent, women in particular. I had a seat at the table and wanted to do more for women across all industries, so I decided to create a space for it.

  1. What services does Luminary provide to women and women-identified?

Luminary is a collaboration hub for women and women-identified who are passionate about professional development and expanding their networks. We are reimagining a space for women with an emphasis on investing in self-development, wellness, flexibility, and giving back. Members have access to a vibrant space and a vast ecosystem of services, offerings, and perks.

An office lounge area with lots of turquoise and brown couches and tables with bright yellow text saying, "@bealuminary" on the wall to the left

Source: Cate Luzio

In addition to curated content, programming, and events, Luminary offers over 15,000 square feet of space in Nomad.  Luminary’s amenities include an open co-working space, a beauty bar, locker room, fitness studio, showers, an abundance of meeting and conference rooms, meditation rooms, lactation rooms, as well as free wine on tap and coffee. Our rooftop bar and terrace will open early this summer.

  1. What was the hardest part about building your company and how did you overcome those barriers?

The hardest part was making the decision to do it. I left a decades-long career in finance to create, self-fund, curate, and open our doors in less than 8 months. The emotional roller coaster of leaving an executive level career to launch my own company was tough.

There were highs and lows and, ultimately, the stability was gone. Whether you self-fund or raise money, it’s all on you. Though it was a huge responsibility, it was worth it. Surrounding myself with a support network was critical and one of the reasons I started the “Female Founders Support Group” at Luminary.

  1. What do memberships with Luminary provide to their members that they wouldn’t have access to without one?

First, all of the workshops, programs, and events are free for Members. There are no hidden costs. Members are invited first to our intimate, curated events.

Second, you have real access to amazing women – not only our Members but our speakers, senior female leaders in our Office Hours program, facilitators, partner networks, corporate members, and partner communities (women’s spaces around the country).

Third, we know how busy you are, so not only do we want to be your career advocate, we want to be your home away from home.

In addition to the amenities listed above, our fitness studio offers daily express classes and our beauty bar is partnered with Glam & Go to provide on-the-go blow-outs.

  1. What is the future of Luminary? What services do you hope to add or expand on? We are very focused on building our community here in New York.

We will be adding more services, such as recruitment and referrals, new curated events and series, as well as additional programming and coaching services. We are a “member-supported community,” so our goal is to tap into our own ecosystem and support our Members’ businesses as much as possible, from food and wine to delivering content and services.

  1. On your site, your bio describes you as “an advocate for gender parity.” It goes on to say you’re “committed to leveraging [your] voice to empower women and girls.” Can you elaborate on this vision and how you hope to accomplish it?

I left a great career in finance to focus on advancing women across all industries, ages, and backgrounds. Already, women are placed into too many buckets like senior/C-level, millennial, creative, entrepreneur, and corporate.

We need to focus on all women, so we can raise each other up, learn from one another, and advance. Luminary provides the much-needed cross-pollination that doesn’t exist today.

My commitment to women’s empowerment starts with our girls. It’s why I am passionate about my role on the National Board of Girls Inc., helping to develop the next generation of future female leaders.

  1. What advice would you give to women who are intimidated to take the leap into the business world

You just have to do it. I had no finance or business background when I went into banking. I saw an opportunity to learn and challenge myself and thought, “what’s the worst that can happen?”

I knew I had to listen, learn, and work hard all the time. You need to start early and build your network as well as your group of mentors, both senior and peer, and find a sponsor early. Ask questions, even the hard ones, and ask for feedback and be ready for the answers.

  1. Is there anything else you’d like to add?

No matter what you do, be yourself. People know those who are authentic and those who are not. Always be prepared and execute.

Take risks and open yourself up to new opportunities. Continue to listen and learn; you’ll make mistakes but you’ll get back up, learn, and walk it off.

By: Vivianna Shields

Spotlight

Meet Dr. Cheryl Robinson: The Entrepreneur-Turned-Model Helping Women Embrace The Pivot

Wondering how to pivot to a new career? Check out the story of Dr. Cheryl Robinson, the entrepreneur-turned-model helping women embrace the pivot.

Published

on

By

Dr. Cheryl Robinson

Dr. Cheryl Robinson is an international speaker, the founder of Ready 2 Roar, a leadership coach, and a regular contributor to ForbesWomen, where she writes about businesswomen who have successfully pivoted through their careers.

She is a clear example of a woman who does not give up when facing any inconvenience because, as she says

“When you get knocked down, you get yourself back up, dust off, and keep going.”

After imagining herself in various job positions when she was younger and trying out a few, she realized her interest in sports was even greater.

So, she went back to the East and worked in sports for 15 years, from the collegiate to the professional level.

That’s when she decided to open her own business. Moreover, Dr. Robinson decided to get a doctorate degree, making her a Doctor of Education in Organizational Leadership, to give her validity and credibility for the books she writes and the workshops she hosts.

After going through all of these different paths and accomplishing various goals, she set out to become a commercial print model.

 

Cheryl Robinson Modeling

“I set out to become a model, which is something I’ve always wanted to be, and that’s what I’m currently working on.”

 

So, now, at the age of 40, she signed with a modeling agency.

Dr. Cheryl has been writing for local newspapers and journals since the age of 14-15 and continued writing in college and even after graduating.

“Still, to this day, my goal is to be a New York Times best-selling author, and to do that, you have to write.”

 

After starting her own company, she committed to herself that 80% of her time would be spent on her writing and the other 20% on her business.

“Three months after I made that commitment to myself, I was attending an event, and I saw a woman speaking on a panel, saying she was a contributor at Forbes. I sat there thinking, ‘if she can do it, I can do it,’ so after the panel, I went right up to her and asked her how she got there.

 

Then, I spoke to her about my background and who I am. And what I didn’t know was that the former editor was in the room with her.

I introduced myself to the editor, who told me to send her my portfolio; three days later, she invited me for a mini-interview process, then a week later,

she called me and said ‘welcome aboard.’ ”

Based on Dr. Robinson’s experience, the best ways of changing and adapting to a new career are the relationships you make, so that it becomes easier for you to make any move in the future.

 

Dr. Cheryl Robinson holding a cup and smiling

“It’s all about the quality of the relationships you foster. Ask people in the company out for a coffee. Get to know your colleagues and what they’re working on; develop that relationship, so when you are ready to make a move, you have allies to help you in your pivot.”

 

There are many ways to pivot in a career, but there are also mistakes that should be avoided in doing so, and according to Dr. Cheryl, “not doing enough research is one of them.”

There are a lot of industries or companies that sound sexy to work for, but the reality may be the opposite or the learning curve might be more intense than you had thought.

Being ill-prepared can hinder your development and progress.

Take the time to research what you want to get into and meet the people who’ve done it before you. Learn from their mistakes before jumping with two feet in; know what you’re getting yourself into. Dr. Robinson believes that there are some ways to know when it’s time to pivot in a career.

“If you’re not growing or being challenged in your current role, or there is an idea that you just can’t stop thinking about, take the risk and step out of your comfort zone.”

 

Dr. Robinson always dreamt of becoming a commercial print model, and after interviewing over 500 individuals for her column, she realized

“it does not matter how old you are. you can always pivot.”

As we grow up, society tells us that we have to reach certain milestones by a certain age. However, it’s just not realistic sometimes.

So, you have to permit yourself to be okay with not hitting certain milestones as quickly as you imagined.

Dr. Robinson has always wanted to see her face on a billboard somewhere, and as she got older, she gained more self-confidence so, at the age of 40, she said “it is now or never.”

Through networking, she met a model agent with whom she talked, did her photos, and her potential got noticed to the point where she got signed with that modeling agency; and has now booked her first gig.

With all of what Dr. Robinson has already accomplished, she still has her head on plans for the near future. Her new leadership book is coming out at the end of this year.

In the new book, she wants readers to understand that pivoting or transitioning in a career doesn’t have to be scary.

“People might get fired, get laid off, move, and then be obligated to find something else, which can seem scary, but if they see it as a positive experience, it is not. Instead, it is an opportunity to develop a strategy to get to where they want to be.”

Want to connect with Dr. Cheryl? You can find her on IG and LinkedIn.

 

Continue Reading

Spotlight

Meet Scott Hughes: The Entrepreneur Who Built One of the Largest Online Book Communities

Are you a book junkie? Find out how Scott Hughes built OnlineBookClub, a free online community for book lovers with over 2 million members.

Avatar photo

Published

on

Scott Hughes

Are you a book lover?

If you are, then you need to check out OnlineBookClub.org, a free online site for book lovers around the world.

The online site features book reviews, book & reading forums, and useful tools that enable you to store, track and list books you have read or want to read.

Scott was only 19 when he launched OnlineBookClub.

The idea of creating OnlineBookClub originated after Scott, a book fanatic, realized that there were too many restrictions for in-person book clubs such as tight deadlines on book reading, a limited selection of books, and little freedom to pick books to read. 

Scott wanted to leverage the power of online discussions and create a flexible space where people all over the world could easily find people to chat about any book at any time. That is how OnlineBookClub came to life. 

Building the online platform was a rewarding experience for Scott, but it was far from easy.

For 7 years, Scott ran the business and paid himself nothing from it. During those years, he worked odd jobs to pay his living expenses and put food on the table for his two kids. 

“I remember one month I had to go to the coinstar machine at the bank with my spare change on the 10th of month just so I could cover the rent, but I did it.”

The hardest part of creating the platform for Scott was finding time to run the business while juggling his day job and raising two kids. It was difficult for him to find a work-life balance but he made it work despite the hardships. 

At the end of 2014, Scott finally took a leap of faith, gave up his side jobs, and went full-time at OnlineBookClub. He knew that to make it work, he had to devote himself completely to the online site.

And his efforts paid off. 

The platform is thriving with over 2.7 million registered users as of November of 2021.

Scott’s team recently released an e-reading app meant to compete with Amazon Kindle, called OBC Reader, which is available on both the Google Play Store and the Apple Store.

The revenue of the platform primarily comes from paid online advertising and professional services to authors and publishers, such as editorial reviews and manuscript editing.

Scott is proud of the work he has accomplished so far, especially of the community he has built.

“OnlineBookClub has always been filled with kind people who have a strong sense of togetherness and community. It’s like a second family for us.” 

Scott’s journey has been full of ups and downs, but through it all, he is grateful for all the experiences-good ones and bad ones.  

When asked to advise young entrepreneurs just starting, he has the following to say:

“The journey never really ends. If you make a million dollars, then you might chase a billion. Even if you reach all your financial goals and lose interest in that side of things, your mind will create new different goals. So it’s never about reaching some destination. When you look back on it, in many ways the most challenging times are also seen most fondly.”

He also believes that entrepreneurs need to be driven by something other than money. 

“I’ve found in my anecdotal experience and just from watching the world around me that those who desperately chase money are the least likely to find it. In contrast, when you work hard on yourself and your real dreams, money chases you. Money–and even health and physical fitness–are only really ever a means, not an end in themselves. Without some kind of vision or passion to be the real end, the real goal, the real dream, it’s like driving a car with no gas.”

Scott’s story is a great reminder that anything can be achieved with perseverance, passion, and hard work.

So, if you are just starting, make sure to stay tuned for his upcoming book, “In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All,” which will be released soon.

You can connect with Scott on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter for more information about OnlineBookClub and get updates about his latest projects. 

 

Continue Reading

Spotlight

‘Halloween Kills’ Cast & Crew Explain the Slasher

Published

on

By

(from left) Karen (Judy Greer), Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) and Allyson (Andi Matichak) in Halloween Kills, directed by David Gordon Green.

Article by Riley Farrell

The cast and crew of Halloween Kills told Blendtw why the latest slasher’s gore is anything but gratuitous in a year like 2021. 

Jamie Lee Curtis, Andi Matichak, Anthony Michael Hall, Kyle Richards, Malek Akkad, David Gordon Green and Jason Blum tell horror fans to expect carnage. After all, Halloween Kills must live up to its title.

Chainsaws buzzing and bats swinging, Halloween Kills is a current-day cathartic catastrophe – and no character is safe – according to producer Jason Blum of Blumhouse Productions.

Halloween Kills is the 12th movie in Michael Myers’ macrocosm, with the 13th, and allegedly final, movie coming out in 2022. When seriously injured Laurie Strode thought she killed Michael Myers after 42 years of trailing him, his annual bloodbath recommences. Sick of living at the mercy of “pure evil,” the town’s vigilantes revolt against the boogieman. 

 

“Subtlety is not this film,” said director David Gordon Green, on fitting in as much bloodshed as possible in 105 minutes.

 

The cast filmed Halloween Kills two years ago and shelved it due to the pandemic, until now.

Picking up where Halloween (2018) left off, the film explores the aftermath of collective trauma, said Green. Given everything that’s ensued in the last two years, viewers do not have to live in Haddonfield to understand suffering, and inversely, resilience. 

 

“We’ve taken a slasher movie and it’s landed in a time of cultural relevance because of our public consciousness,” said Green. “Though [the movie is] grotesque, there are moments when we feel the humanity underneath the surface of this movie monster.”

 

Halloween Kills brought back two characters from the 1978 Halloween in Tommy Doyle (Anthony Michael Hall) and Lindsey Wallace (Kyle Richards), the two children who Laurie babysat during Michael’s initial attack. Hall and Richards did not require much persuasion to hop on the franchise, said Green.

 

Halloween kills

Jamie Lee Curtis as Laurie Strode in Halloween Kills, directed by David Gordon Green

The callbacks of all-grown-up characters, of course, evokes nostalgia. But the twist on the trope is that, instead of running from Michael, the kids now face him head-on, said Richards. Hall, who described Halloween Kills as a “thrill ride” and “freight train,” said the slasher hinges on human resilience.

 

“We summoned something deep in themselves and decided to fight back, we’re not just survivors but fighters,” said Hall.

 

Resilience as a motif snugly fits within the cultural zeitgeist, even earning a title as Forbes’ 2021 word of the year. Though coincidental, the visceral and violent images in Halloween Kills harken to audiences’ nihilistic experiences of the past 18-months. Producer Malek Akkad said the slasher film can paradoxically be pertinent yet escapist for viewers who’ve experienced the horror genre by simply reading the news.

 

“It’s tough for everybody right now and this movie’s just a fun release,” said Akkad. “There’s nothing more cathartic for people watching than to see a final girl like Laurie.”

 

For reference, the final girl trope, pioneered by the character of Laurie Strode in John Carpenter’s 1978 Halloween, represents the heroine left standing at the end of a horror movie who is charged with defeating the antagonist. Film theorist Carol J. Clover coined the term in her 1992 book, ‘Men, Women, and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film.’ The final girl has been observed in many films, including The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Alien, Friday the 13th, A Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream.

 Scream queen Jamie Lee Curtis said she was unaware of the meaning and dialogue surrounding the final girl until recently. She argued, even though the trope has immense cultural significance, the original idea of the final girl is uncomplicated.

 

“The term is just about the tenacity of women to survive because, the truth is, women have survived through a lot,” said Curtis.

 

No characters know survival better than the Strode women. Andi Matichak, who plays Laurie’s granddaughter, and Curtis agreed that their favorite behind-the-scenes moment centered on feminine resilience in spite of harsh conditions.

 

Halloween Kills

Michael Myers (aka The Shape) in Halloween Kills, directed by David Gordon Green.

It was a frigid 4 a.m. shoot, and the three generations of Strode ladies were alone in a truck, coated in fake blood, with only each other and a camera rig for warmth, Matichak described. This moment was the last time Laurie, Karen and Allyson were on screen together.

 

“It was a powerful moment to lean on each other and feel the weight of the project,” Matichak said.

 

Cutting through the sweet moments is the slasher at the heart of the story, said Curtis on the “high octave, frenzied” plot of Halloween Kills. For audiences who’ve lived through the chaos of the past two years, Halloween Kills should match their fast pace of existence.

 

“The past is irrelevant, you’re so in the present moment,” said Curtis.

 

THAT’S A WRAP! SHARE THE LOVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA.

DO YOU WANT USEFUL TIPS & RESOURCES? FOLLOW US ON PINTEREST & INSTAGRAM

 

Continue Reading

Trending

College Money
blendtw

SAVE AND MAKE

MONEY IN COLLEGE

free email series 

 

      Tips & Resources to make hundreds

                  and save BIG in college 

1 Shares
Share
Tweet
Pin1
Share