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Meet Shani Syphrett, The Innovative Strategist Empowering Women of Color

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Source: Shani Syphrett

Even if you’ve never heard of Shani Syphrett, you’ve probably been impacted by her work. She’s the mastermind behind the branding and marketing strategies that keep some of the biggest brands and corporations around the world connected to the public via field-tested brand building, experiential marketing, customer acquisition, and customer retention strategies. In layman’s terms, she’s one of the people responsible for keeping them up to date with their rapidly-growing and ever-changing consumer base.

She’s also the founder of Jamila Studio, a launchpad serving women of color that encourages and empowers them to share their stories and drive themselves forward through accessible one-on-one mentoring, brand coaching, and peer mentoring networks.

Jamila Studio staffers who focus on empowering women are a diverse group of women posing in front of a white brick wall.
Source: Shani Syphrett

We caught up with Syphrett to learn more about her role as a strategist, the influences and impact associated with her work, and what it means for her to empower women of color and drive their success.

You’re a Brand and Marketing Strategist for companies such as Samsung, Nike,  McDonald’s, Refinery29, and Gap. How do you help these well-established companies step into the future of marketing to and serving their customers?

My philosophy around brand and marketing strategy is serving the right customers with the right product at the right time. Much of what I bring to the table for the companies that I work with is getting them to step away from any assumptions they have about the customers they are trying to chase and examine who the qualities of their product or service are uniquely positioned to serve at the moment. Many times that means abandoning putting their customers in demographic boxes and looking at how they actually behave in an internet-connected, barrier-breaking world.

When did you realize that you wanted to be a Brand Strategist?

To me, it’s all human ecology – the relationship between people and their natural, social, and built environments. I would say I fell into strategy because of my innate curiosity and empathy and a few people in my life who entered in at just the right times to advocate for me and push outside of my comfort zone. I’ve always wanted to solve problems and I am lucky to be able to do that every day.

Why do you think it is important to offer support and additional resources to Women of color and intersectional identities, at large. How have you seen intersectional identity groups benefit from tailored support?

I see the work that I do for Women of color as something I am uniquely positioned to do. My experience often puts me in positions where I am the only one who looks, thinks, or acts like me. At first, it depressed me because I felt isolated and misunderstood. Now I see it for what it is: my obligation to open the door and bring others with me. And we all need that. No one succeeds all on their own. We move so much further when there is someone ahead of us, or someone who has access, who is specifically looking to help us. I made a decision to be a resource for Women of color and I see the fruits of that decision both big and small.

In 2015, you founded Jamila Studio as a consulting firm and project studio that helps high-performing women of color to thrive. How have you seen Jamila studio serving and empowering women through these endeavors? How important do you think Jamila studio is in their journey towards success?

I like to think that Jamila Studio provides creative capital and people capital for Women of color and, hopefully, soon, financial capital. What originally was a container for me to house all of my freelance creative work turned into a way for me to provide scalable support for a largely ignored market: innovative women of color. The one-on-one advising, coaching, bootcamp-style teaching, monthly meetup, and digital publication are an ecosystem that helps me reach women at different stages of their journeys. Maybe they’re just starting out and need confidence boosters and general direction. Maybe they are launching something new and need the right strategy behind them. Maybe they’ve already reached a certain milestone and need the co-sign, or connection of their peers to get them to the next step. Maybe they just want to be in the know about the myriad of options and resources out there that they can leverage to be successful. It’s the way that I can help the most people without burning myself out.

Shani is at a Chat & Chew meetup speaking to a group of people sitting in chairs in a circle.
Source: Shani Syphrett

You also started monthly Chat & Chew meetups. Where did the idea to host Chat & Chew meetups come from? How have you seen these monthly meetups impact the attendees both on a personal and professional level?

Selfishly, the Chat & Chew meetups began because I was drowning in “coffee date” requests. Though I wish I could help everyone, I am an introvert who needs a fair amount of downtime. There came a point, I believe it was after about a year of leading workshops for various entrepreneurship programs and conferences and writing for Forbes, where there was a request for a coffee date and pick your brain session every day. I just couldn’t keep up. I was meeting so many new great women, needing to catch up with others, and often wanting to connect women who I thought could benefit from each other. So Chat & Chew was born. It’s invite-only conversation between peers who help each other celebrate wins, get through tricky work-related tasks, and air out the things we don’t feel comfortable doing with just anyone. I could not have imagined the sisterhood and enterprising I’ve seen since it started. It’s warm, validating, and actionable support. It feels like the most significant thing I’ve ever done.

On top of being an active brand strategist and running Jamila Studio, you are also a regular contributor for Forbes. Have you always been interested in writing? How does being a Forbes contributor tie in with your other projects?

Contributing to Forbes came from my passion to be an advocate for women of color. It’s all connected for me. I get to expose the world to dope, innovative women of color who may have been overlooked because they don’t know anyone “in the know”. I get to open that door for them and that makes a difference for them professionally and personally. I get to vouch for these women under the Forbes banner. The writing is just the vehicle.

What is one piece of advice you would give to women of color in any career field?

Clarity comes from engagement and not just thought. You won’t figure out who you are meant to be until you get out there and try to be it.

By: Alla Issa

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Makers

Claire Coder Sheds the Stigma on Menstruation

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Source: Claire Coder

Claire Coder, founder and CEO of Aunt Flow, is an empowering female entrepreneur and advocate for making people comfortatreble when talking about menstruation.

Not all men are aware of women’s menstrual cycles and the importance of having menstrual products at a reachable distance. In addition, there is a stigma about menstruation that needs to be dismantled. Coder and her team at Aunt Flow work to #ShedTheStigma and educate the public about menstruation.

During a Columbus Startup event, Coder unexpectedly got her period without the supplies she needed. So, she had to leave the event filled with majority male participants to go buy tampons.

To address the inequity with a sustainable solution, at age 18, Coder founded Aunt Flow. Since its establishment in 2016, the business works towards its mission to ensure that “everyone has access to quality menstrual products.”

To accomplish its mission, the team at Aunt Flow provides 100% organic cotton tampons and pads to companies and organizations at no charge. Requests for menstrual products can be made on the Aunt Flow website. Coder believes that menstrual products should be made readily available for free since it is a necessity.

“Toilet paper is offered for free, why aren’t tampons and pads?” Claire states.

Claire Coder
Source: Claire Coder

Launching a start-up is no easy work. She worked odd jobs to raise $1.5 million in order to stock and fund over 350 businesses and schools.

When the business was launched, what were some of the greatest fears? How and when were the fears overcome?

One obstacle with a B2B [business to business] menstrual product business is that some decision-makers—primarily men—don’t always see the need for products in their bathrooms. Because they’ve never personally had a period, they don’t always view tampons and pads as bathroom necessities, like toilet paper. However, the large majority of the operations and facilities, people, office managers and other business owners we’ve worked with are certified FLOW BROS. They get why freely-accessible products matter: they support menstruators AND help business’ bottom lines.

Aunt flow provides women with organic tampons and pads, which is quite different from major menstrual product brands. What is the importance of using organic ingredients?

Transparency is key when it comes to what we put in our bodies. Unfortunately, the FDA currently classifies tampons as ‘medical devices,’ and major menstrual product brands are not required to disclose their ingredients. If we take the extra time to go for an organic apple, why would menstruators want to put chemicals (including rayons, dyes, and toxins!) into their bodies? Our tampons and pads are made from 100% organic cotton and contain no dyes, perfumes, or other WEIRD stuff.

 What advice do you have for aspiring female entrepreneurs?

Always believe in yourself and Google something when you’re not sure!

One of your accomplishments is being an advocate for making people comfortable when talking about menstruation. What are some initiatives that you have taken to advocate for this cause?

From the beginning, Aunt Flow has aimed to get people talking about menstruation and why menstrual stigma sucks. To #ShedTheStigma, we refer to our products as ‘menstrual products’ and ditched the term ‘feminine hygiene products.’ The latter implies that getting your period is somehow dirty or gross, when it’s just another normal bodily function. This verbiage is also inclusive of everyone who gets a flow, not just cisgender women. We use this same inclusive language on our social media to make people comfortable when talking about menstruation.

You have also stated that you are a “proud college drop-out.” How did you make this decision? What influenced your determination?

I have always had an entrepreneurial instinct, and I didn’t feel like college was giving me the tools needed for genuine social impact. I dropped out of college after one semester to fight for menstrual equity, and the rest is history!

What is a fun fact about you that not many people know?

I owned a company in high school called, “There’s a Badge For That” where I made trendy buttons, magnets and compact mirrors with different designs on them. I was a top seller on Etsy as a sixteen-year-old!

Claire Coder
Source: Claire Coder

What are the future goals for the company?

Our team wants to ensure EVERYONE has access to quality menstrual products. Soon, we want to see our products supporting people in 1,000 businesses and schools.

Coder exhibited her entrepreneurial instincts early on. Her experience enhanced her career as a successful entrepreneur, who sheds the stigma on menstruation.

By: Kahyun Kim

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Makers

Meet Gaby Wall Street – The Hispanic Woman Sparking A Movement in the Stock Market

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Source: Gabriela Berrospi | Gaby Wall Street

Gabriela Berrospi is actively spreading empowerment to the Hispanic community with her business venture, Gaby Wall Street. She works to motivate Latinos and give them the tools they need to take control of their own lives and achieve economic freedom by investing in the stock market.

Originally from Peru, Berrospi had a dream of having success in the business world. She began making that dream a reality when she earned a scholarship to NYU while living near Wall Street. Living so close to the lifestyle of a person in finance, she realized what was possible if you put effort into it. With this, she was referring to investing in the stock market.

“If you learn how to trade, if you master it and learn how to apply it, you can do it,” said Berrospi.

Berrospi’s venture took a turn when she attended a conference and met a well-known Hispanic influencer and started a conversation about Berrospi’s future. She realized that although she had been teaching others what she had learned about trading, Berrospi had never taught it in Spanish to the Hispanic community. This group of people lacking support was a massive opportunity for Berrospi to become the voice for members of an untouched market and primarily the advocate for women in the Hispanic community.

“Go against the status quo. You can be your own Wall Street.”

The ‘How-To’ business is currently very successful, and Berrospi received advice to enter that market with her venture. The influencer kindly insisted on promoting Berrospi’s start-up on his Instagram story. Overnight, Berrospi was contacted by over five hundred women interested in her coaching and empowerment in becoming successful traders. A thousand followers within the first hour were posting about and sharing Berrospi’s venture. This immediate acceptance served as proof that there was a business opportunity in entering the Hispanic market.

So far, Berrospi has coached eighty clients within the last couple of months and is thrilled at the rate these women are seeking support. It can, at times, be overwhelming for Berrospi to expose herself in her posts, but it has also been a great learning experience. Though her increased work in addressing the audience has been new for Berrospi, she has loved the opportunity to serve and personally contribute to the community.

“Patience and discipline are the most important things to succeed in this industry.”

Sometimes people are more focused on just short-term strategies and lack the attention needed for long-term planning. Staying on top of this routine requires discipline.

Berrospi is constantly facing challenges of proving herself as a young woman and a minority. Her identity has worked in her favor when connecting with her clients because it has established a connection within the community. A goal of Berrospi’s venture is to show Hispanic women that they have the ability to make money to support themselves.

“You don’t need a lot of money to start out. Start small and go from there. Continue to contribute to your portfolio, and in the end, it will empower you.”

Berrospi’s just released an advanced online course known as VIP Traders in partnership with her partner Alan Burak, a hedge fund owner and trader with more than 20 years of experience. The purpose of this course is to make their combined knowledge globally accessible. More than a course, VIP traders is a community that aims to help people achieve economic freedom. Soon, Berrospi will not only inspire people in the Hispanic Community but also people from countries all over the world.

By: Sydney Murphy

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Makers

Meet Cate Luzio: CEO of Luminary, A Female-Focused Collaboration Company

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Source: Cate Luzio

Cate Luzio is the founder and CEO of Luminary, New York City’s leading collaboration space for women and women-identified. At Luminary, Luzio invests in women while empowering them in the workforce.

Keeping women in the workforce is important to Luzio. Luzio and her team at Luminary work together to create a space where women across many industries can expand their professional development and networks.

For three years in a row, American Banker recognized Luzio on their Top 25 Women to Watch. She has over 20 years of experience in financial services and she hopes to use her expertise to help guide other women with the community and platform Luminary has become.

Luminary is a female-focused and forward-looking company that ultimately ensures you “We Are in This Together”.

  1. You have over 20 years of experience in financial services, how did your past experience lead you to start your own company?

My past experience really led me to start Luminary. I spent many years in senior leadership roles, building and growing global teams, and managing large P&Ls.

Most of my free time was devoted to developing, coaching and mentoring talent, women in particular. I had a seat at the table and wanted to do more for women across all industries, so I decided to create a space for it.

  1. What services does Luminary provide to women and women-identified?

Luminary is a collaboration hub for women and women-identified who are passionate about professional development and expanding their networks. We are reimagining a space for women with an emphasis on investing in self-development, wellness, flexibility, and giving back. Members have access to a vibrant space and a vast ecosystem of services, offerings, and perks.

Luminary is a collaboration hub for women and women-identified who are passionate about professional development and expanding their networks.

Source: Cate Luzio

In addition to curated content, programming, and events, Luminary offers over 15,000 square feet of space in Nomad.  Luminary’s amenities include an open co-working space, a beauty bar, locker room, fitness studio, showers, an abundance of meeting and conference rooms, meditation rooms, lactation rooms, as well as free wine on tap and coffee. Our rooftop bar and terrace will open early this summer.

  1. What was the hardest part about building your company and how did you overcome those barriers?

The hardest part was making the decision to do it. I left a decades-long career in finance to create, self-fund, curate, and open our doors in less than 8 months. The emotional roller coaster of leaving an executive level career to launch my own company was tough.

There were highs and lows and, ultimately, the stability was gone. Whether you self-fund or raise money, it’s all on you. Though it was a huge responsibility, it was worth it. Surrounding myself with a support network was critical and one of the reasons I started the “Female Founders Support Group” at Luminary.

  1. What do memberships with Luminary provide to their members that they wouldn’t have access to without one?

First, all of the workshops, programs, and events are free for Members. There are no hidden costs. Members are invited first to our intimate, curated events.

Second, you have real access to amazing women – not only our Members but our speakers, senior female leaders in our Office Hours program, facilitators, partner networks, corporate members, and partner communities (women’s spaces around the country).

Third, we know how busy you are, so not only do we want to be your career advocate, we want to be your home away from home.

In addition to the amenities listed above, our fitness studio offers daily express classes and our beauty bar is partnered with Glam & Go to provide on-the-go blow-outs.

  1. What is the future of Luminary? What services do you hope to add or expand on? We are very focused on building our community here in New York.

We will be adding more services, such as recruitment and referrals, new curated events and series, as well as additional programming and coaching services. We are a “member-supported community,” so our goal is to tap into our own ecosystem and support our Members’ businesses as much as possible, from food and wine to delivering content and services.

  1. On your site, your bio describes you as “an advocate for gender parity.” It goes on to say you’re “committed to leveraging [your] voice to empower women and girls.” Can you elaborate on this vision and how you hope to accomplish it?

I left a great career in finance to focus on advancing women across all industries, ages, and backgrounds. Already, women are placed into too many buckets like senior/C-level, millennial, creative, entrepreneur, and corporate.

We need to focus on all women, so we can raise each other up, learn from one another, and advance. Luminary provides the much-needed cross-pollination that doesn’t exist today.

My commitment to women’s empowerment starts with our girls. It’s why I am passionate about my role on the National Board of Girls Inc., helping to develop the next generation of future female leaders.

  1. What advice would you give to women who are intimidated to take the leap into the business world

You just have to do it. I had no finance or business background when I went into banking. I saw an opportunity to learn and challenge myself and thought, “what’s the worst that can happen?”

I knew I had to listen, learn, and work hard all the time. You need to start early and build your network as well as your group of mentors, both senior and peer, and find a sponsor early. Ask questions, even the hard ones, and ask for feedback and be ready for the answers.

  1. Is there anything else you’d like to add?

No matter what you do, be yourself. People know those who are authentic and those who are not. Always be prepared and execute.

Take risks and open yourself up to new opportunities. Continue to listen and learn; you’ll make mistakes but you’ll get back up, learn, and walk it off.

By: Vivianna Shields

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