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How Parasite and Bong Joong-Ho’s Wins at the Academy Awards Represents a Triumph for South Korean Culture

Sydney Murphy

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At the Academy Awards, Bong-Joon-ho promotes South Korean Culture by winning best picture for his movie, Parasite.
Source: Commons.Wikimedia.org

The film “Parasite” blew the nation away with its Academy Award for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best International Feature. The film, directed by Bong Joo Ho, is a combination of drama, horror and dark comedy.

“Parasite” is the first foreign-language film to win Best Picture at the Oscars.

“South Korea did it,” and “History made,” tweeted Chinese American filmmaker Jon Chu.

The impressive accomplishment trended on social media mainly from South Koreans and Asian Americans. The win was celebrated all over the world and has been an empowering and enlightening experience for the Asian community.

Many leaders in the film industry have commented on the US finally embracing a film presented in a language other than English and produced outside of Hollywood.

“Does this mean Hollywood is ready for a change? If Parasite’s big win makes some curious moviegoers venture out and check out some more Korean or other international movies, I think the change is coming,” said Wonsuk Chin, a South Korean film director.

Blowing the country away with his support of the film, South Korean President Moon Jae-in commented on the Oscars win, saying that he was “proud of director Bong Joon Ho, the actors and crew.”

“When I was young and studying cinema, there was a saying that I carved deep into my heart, which is, ‘the most personal in the most creative,’” said director Bong Joon Ho in his Oscars acceptance speech for Best Director. 

The film “Parasite” is advocating for South Korean culture and has gained traction and prominence in the West.

However, this is not the first time a Korean film has been recognized in the West. The 2016 South Korean film “Train to Busan” rose to fame debuting at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival.

The film was a zombie apocalypse and was a favorite among international markets.

These recent recognitions of the South Korean culture are growing to represent demographic change at the Oscars.

Many describe the change as the American film industry finally recognizing stories that had been left in the shadows in the past. These stories include those of different races, sexualities, genders, and class experiences.

“This is a remarkable chapter in Korean culture. Something I’m still pinching my cheek about,” said Chin.

The power of subtitles has been brought up in comments about the film industry as well. In the past, Hollywood has negated subtitles because they were not yet seen as an expression of identity, as they are now.

The incorporation of other languages in the film industry opens the door to many more stories that would otherwise be overlooked or misinterpreted. 

“Tonight I heard the language of my family on the Oscars stage. I can’t wait to hear many, many more,” tweeted Korean-American online creator Eugene Lee Yang.

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