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5 Ways to Stay Involved in the Black Lives Matter Movement

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Martin Luther King Jr. making a speech in front of a crowd of people.
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The Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement gained heightened social media presence in May 2020, in response to the murder of George Floyd, and some have noted it as the most significant civil rights movement since the 1960s. Others have called these movements one and the same, with the ongoing protests being taken up by a new generation to continue the same fight. Regardless of how historians classify these events, they serve as a reminder of the justice needed for POC (people of color) who have suffered at the hands of brutal police and a corrupt justice system.

After the murder of George Floyd,  the BLM movement exploded worldwide, but as time passes, some become less involved in protests and activism, while others forget about it entirely. In addition to this, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has continually complicated the organization of protests and other events in support of the BLM movement, especially as cases continue to rise exponentially. To make matters worse, the mass media has turned its attention away from the movement, taking away the spotlight on this vital social issue.. Fortunately, as the world moves continually online, there are several ways to stay involved in the movement, even if activists must get creative with how they go about it.

1) Online Threads and Forums

One of the most critical ways one can remain active in the BLM movement is through communication with other activists and, most importantly, people who have lived through the racism that this movement is trying to prevent. BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) have actively created online threads and forums to share and discuss their experiences as marginalized communities in the United States.

Twitter has become a hotbed for these kinds of interactions, with these threads painting users’ feeds in the immediate months after the murder of George Floyd. Since then, these threads have occurred less frequently, but they can be easily found with a quick search of specific keywords, such as “BLM,” “racial injustice,” and other phrases significant within the BLM movement. These threads are mainly created by BIPOC speaking on their experiences, so critical reading is especially important to catch the details and nuances of their specific experience.

2) Educate Yourself on Intersectionality

Intersectionality, or the links between different social identities, such as gender, sexuality, and race, has come to the forefront of discussions in response to the BLM movement. However, many still don’t understand the complexities of having intersecting identities. This has become especially prevalent as light is brought to the specific struggles of black women, such as how they are treated in the workplace or hospitals (especially during and after pregnancy). After Breonna Taylor was murdered in her home in Louisville, Kentucky, her story has become a particular note in the BLM movement.

BLM artwork on a brick wall depicting George Floyd and Breonna Taylor.
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There has been significant discourse surrounding queer identities in BIPOC communities, particularly how they are affected by homophobia and transphobia, as well as the increased prevalence of STDs in these communities. Author George M. Johnson wrote in their 2020 memoir All Boys Aren’t Blue about the heightened conflict that queer BIPOC face, elaborating on the violence and hate that black youth face as they come into their queer identities. By acknowledging and learning more about the intersectionality of BIPOC, activists can help protect and make space for them.

3) Support BIPOC Creators and Businesses

People often picture activism as marching in protests and posting solidarity posts on social media, but it is far deeper than that alone. In a society that has actively suppressed black voices and the works of other people of color, one of the most important ways activists can support BIPOC right now is by uplifting their voices and work, especially that of independent creators whose income relies on the support of their communities.

A shop window with a sign on it saying,
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Supporting independent BIPOC creators empowers them and promotes their visibility in the world, not only through increasing their success, but also through the celebration of their work. Many BIPOC creators are influenced by the culture of their ancestors, much of which has been historically and traumatically destroyed. By supporting black and indigenous creators, you can help return some of this culture to the modern-day, instead of letting it be lost over time.

4) Actively Diversify

A crucial aspect of the BLM movement is the recognition that other identities exist outside of your own, and from that, creating spaces for those individuals. Recognizing these people and actively diversifying your space and the spaces of others allows for marginalized groups to have a voice in places they otherwise would not have.

Diversity activists, two women and a man speaking into a microphone.
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Diversifying your own social media feeds and who you interact with in real life might be easy enough for some, but diversifying spaces that you don’t necessarily belong to can often be challenging. Because of this, it is important to hold authority figures and leaders accountable by calling for more diversity and recognition of BIPOC within positions of power and influential groups of people.

5) Mutual Aid and Direct Donations

BIPOC are disproportionately impacted by poverty and wealth inequality within the United States, and many have been harmed further because of the fines placed upon those at BLM protests. At the height of media coverage of these protests, a plethora of bail funds circulated on social media for others to donate to. Since then, more GoFundMe’s spot Twitter timelines and Instagram stories, giving donors the opportunity to give directly to BIPOC in need of financial assistance.

An activist standing in a crowd holding a sign with
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These donations can lead to mutual aid, with the recipients of the donations able to continue protesting and working for the betterment of everyone in our society. It serves as a reflection of the good that is accomplished through the efforts of protestors, activists, and allies. By reciprocating the aid you are given, you learn how these social issues apply to you, even if you are not directly impacted by them. Regardless of how you aid the BLM movement, the work of activists is continuing, with or without media coverage.

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A New Home for Asian American Representation in Film

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After the onslaught of negative reactions to Mulan (2020), Disney’s recent film announcements offer new hope for Asian representation in the entertainment industry. From Raya and the Last Dragon to Shang-Chi: The Legend of the Ten Rings, Disney has opened up a larger space for Asian Americans to shine, but can they do it right this time? Here are a few movies that offer a new home for Asian American representation in film. 

Mulan in Crisis 

Over quarantine, Disney+ users dreamed about the promise of greater authenticity and Chinese representation in the live-action of Mulan. The film had an aggressive campaign of staying true to the original ballad of Mulan, and established a more serious approach than its animated companion. 

Soon after its release, however, audiences were sorely met with lackluster characterization and collapsing themes of Asian female empowerment. In addition to the outrage concerning main actress Yifei Liu’s support of Hong Kong police, Mulan (2020) suffered from its generalization of Chinese history and glorification of outdated values. 

An overwhelming backlash, in this case, was inevitable. The Asian American community responded with a plethora of media criticizing Disney’s failures with Mulan

As Disney enters a new era in the streaming industry, however, there has been some hope for growth in its relationship with Asian representation. 

Raya the First 

Though some have pointed out its stylistic similarity to Avatar: The Last Airbender, many others have applauded Raya and the Last Dragon for its introduction of Southeast Asian representation into the animated sphere. The new film portrays Raya, a fictional Southeast Asian warrior princess, who must search for the last dragon in order to save her world. 

Throughout its trailer, Raya and the Last Dragon hints at a variety of Southeast Asian cultures. Producers have claimed inspiration from countries such as Thailand, Myanmar, Vietnam and others, but many viewers have recognized the film’s direct representation of Filipino design and culture.

While the ability to openly point out such specific cultural moments paves an optimistic path, another question arises in Disney’s choice for a film that works to “blend Southeast Asian cultures” rather a distinct country. This particularly speaks to the ways in which Southeast Asian and Pacific Islander communities are too often consolidated as one culture. Whereas films like Mulan enjoy the cultural specificity of being Chinese, Moana and now Raya and the Last Dragon must settle for a more generic representation of being “Southeast Asian” or “Pacific Islander”, as opposed to Filipino or Tongan. 

This also comes with the replacement of half-Filipina Cassie Steele with Vietnamese Kelly Marie Tran. While Raya and the Last Dragon has been largely recognized for its distinctive Filipino references, the film continues to largely err on the side of mixing (and potentially confusing) a variety of Southeast Asian creatives. 

In the midst of such a struggle, however, Raya and the Last Dragon nevertheless represents the beginning of Southeast Asian involvement in the film industry, with hopes for more to come. 

Shang-Chi and the Legend of Yellow Peril 

Marvel’s latest Shang-Chi: The Legend of the Ten Rings also provides a new avenue for Asian representation, especially in the superhero realm. 

Simu Liu, set to play Shang-Chi, has been a longtime favorite in the Asian American film industry. From acting in short films with Wong Fu Productions to playing the sweet but arrogant Jung on Kim’s Convenience, Liu is a familiar face in the Asian American community and reflects their desire for diversity on camera. 

However, there is hesitation about rehashing the damaging Asian stereotypes from the original Shang-Chi comics. Inspired by the age of martial arts films, Shang-Chi echoes the era of Fu Manchu and Yellow Peril, when Asians were essentially characterized as purely evil

Fu Manchu represented the culmination of America’s anti-Asian, anti-immigrant anxieties and fears. In the comics, Shang-Chi is the son of Fu Manchu and equips his martial arts to destroy his father. Such a relationship spoke to the utilization of the “best” parts of Asian culture (a.k.a martial arts) to take down the “worst” parts (acting or looking “too Asian”). This divisiveness ultimately denounces an Asian identity, uplifting only that which is “best” in the eyes of others. 

Knowing this history, Shang-Chi holds the potential to backslide in the same ways that Mulan (2020) did, by focusing too much on a presumed perspective of “authenticity”. In the making of Shang-Chi, Disney must pull from contemporary Asian America, rather than its past.

As Simu Liu has pointed out, however, there is hope! Both Shang-Chi: The Legend of the Ten Rings and Raya and the Last Dragon have released their massive inclusion of a largely Asian and Asian American cast and creative team. This means that, in contrast to Mulan’s implementation of solely Asian actors, these two new films will be written and creatively produced by the same people it seeks to represent. In this way, Disney is truly learning from its failure with the live-action Mulan (2020). Though there has been some early criticism for the next two films, a positive anticipation flourishes in Disney’s changes for greater Asian representation in film and media.

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Grammy Nominations for 2020 Miss the Mark For Rap Album of the Year

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Rap has recently become the most populars genre of music in America, but despite this, the Grammys continue to nominate rap albums that are not representative of the genre as a whole. The Grammy nominations for 2020’s Rap Album of The Year were swept under the rug by the ongoing pandemic, but nevertheless, hip-hop fans across the country were taken aback by the albums that the Academy chose to nominate, as well as leave out. In a year where trap music swept hip-hop, with artists like Lil Baby and Lil Uzi Vert dominating the charts, not one nominated album falls into this subgenre. Hip-hop fans across the country simply want to know: why?   

The Grammy’s controversy with Rap Music

To answer this question we must first look at the history of the Grammys, an organization that has been making faux pas in their rap nominations since the inception of the category. In 1996, the year the Grammy’s created the Rap Album of The Year Award, 2-Pac’s Me Against The World, lost to Naughty By Nature’s Poverty’s Paradise, which was, to put it bluntly, a horrible decision. Many believe 2-Pac, who died later the same year, was one of the GOAT’s (Greatest  of All Time) in Hip-Hop, and to lose in this manner, with debatably his strongest work, is emblematic of the way the Grammy’s make their decisions.

Don’t just take my word for it, though; in 2008, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame included Me Against the World in the Definitive 200 Albums of All Time list, and Pac’s first #1 single Dear Mama, which appeared on the album, went platinum, just five months after its release.

Naughty By Nature, which was extremely popular in the early 90’s, were by no means a bad rap group, but their Grammy win in 1996 set a precedent for the Academy that showed how out of touch they were with the hip-hop community.

Graffiti on a wall that reads 'Hip Hop.'
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To give a more recent example, Kendrick Lamar(another rapper understood as one of the GOAT’s), was nominated in 2014 for his album Good Kid Maad City, which is universally respected as one of the best rap albums of this decade. Nevertheless, Macklemore, whose hit song Thrift Shop went viral that same year, won the award with his debut album The Heist. This name was ironically fitting for the album, with Macklemore himself texting Kendrick after his win, stating, “You got robbed. I wanted you to win. You should have. It’s weird and sucks that I robbed you.”

With rappers themselves feeling like their wins were unwarranted, and albums of the highest tier getting snubbed for the award, we start to get a picture of where the Grammys have gone awry in the past. This year, we see a similar phenomenon, with a list of nominees that ranges from Freddie Gibbs “Alfredo”, which critics ranked as one of the top albums of the year, top Royce Da 5’9’s “The Allegory” which was described by as “(featuring) as many showy passages as clunky stumbling blocks.”

This Years Nominations 

Two of the five albums nominated this year were, in my opinion, deserving of this honor. As I mentioned previously Alfredo, a collaborative project between rapper Freddie Gibbs, and producer The Alchemist, is a dynamic piece of music. The alchemist’s style complements Gibbs’ rough but melodic flow perfectly, and “on Alfredo, that style is vintage luxury, bathed in elegant piano with faded textures colored by time that sound even more beautiful now than when they were new.” Additionally, Jay Electronica’s long-awaited A Written Testimony is a mystical, distinctive work that nearly lives up to all the lore surrounding the rapper.”

Also described as “a prayerful offering that expresses the many spiritual and communal virtues he has internalized”, A Written Testimony, is one of those rap albums that you may not listen to in the club, but you have to respect for its intricate lyricism and complex themes throughout.

Both Alfredo and A Written Testimony received rave reviews from critics, with an 8/10 and 8.5/10 respectively, and were some of the best lyrical rap albums of the year. The issue with this year’s nominations arises with the rest of the nominees. All three were poorer versions of the lyrical subgenre in rap, showing a lack of variety or holistic taste from the Academy, while also taking up the space of more deserving albums. D Smoke’s Black Habits was definitely the best of the three, as it “(weaved) soulful, jazz, gospel, spoken word with a dose of Spanish, acoustic vibes, and a touch of synth to explore the central theme.”

This album simply didn’t deserve a Grammy nod because of D Smokes’ lack of experience in the rap game. The Winner of the hip-hop reality TV competition Rhythm and Flow in 2019, Smoke absolutely deserves his nomination in the Best New Artist category. Unfortunately, other rappers with equally good, if not better, albums, a solid fanbase, and extensive history in the genre are more deserving of the Album of The Year nomination.

The other two nominees are where it starts to get worse, with Nas’ Kings Disease getting a Grammy nod despite its description as (marking) a retreat into a nostalgia-act comfort zone, one that suits him even as it yields diminishing returns.” Nas’ has the inverse problem of D Smoke with this album; he is too far towards the end of his career, as opposed to too close to the beginning. With a rating of 6.3/10, this is one of Nas’ least exciting albums, and it just feels like a strange nomination, with no clear justification by the Academy. The final Album of the Year nominee is Royce Da 5’9’s The Allegory. With a 5.8/10, The Allegory does not live up to the weaker competition in this list by the critics’ standards and was not impressively popular on the charts. Unlike the wise knowledge dropped by Jay Electronica on A Written Testimony, this album“features as many showy passages as clunky stumbling blocks”, as Royce conveys “a heavy-handed attempt at converting his listeners to woke enlightenment.”

A closeup of a microphone.
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The 3 Albums the Grammys Missed…Badly

  1. Lil Baby’s My Turn was one of the most popular albums of the year with 197K first week sales/streams, making up for its less than phenomenal 6.6/10 critic rating. Despite criticism, the album still features some of the year’s biggest songs including Woah and Grace Ft.42 Dugg, and in a year so big for Baby, the album definitely deserved recognition over some of the others that were chosen. 
  1. Polo G’s The Goat was a great follow up to his debut, being extremely popular and well-reviewed by critics. One article stated “The Chicago rapper’s follow-up to his riveting debut LP argues for him as an adaptable and unmissable talent, an unlikely star in a new major-label system…Polo G raps with a sing-song lilt, but his songs are shaded with murders, heartbreak, and incredible pain.” With a 7.7/10 rating and 99,00 first week sales/streams, The Goat has both the popularity and respect to deserve a nomination, in a year where Polo G cemented himself as one one of the largest up and coming faces in Hip Hop
  1. Lil Uzi Vert’s Eternal Atake was one of the biggest rap albums of 2020, and with 288,00 first week sales/streams, it is a shock that it was left off the nominee listing. Matching Jay Electronica’s critical review of 8.4/10, and with incredible sales, Eternal Atake has an even better argument than The Goat for having both critical acclaim and chart-topping numbers. In the album, “The Philly rapper has evolved into an untouchable pop artist in sound and style. With deliriously good rapping and immaculate production, Uzi makes an event album live up to its name.”
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Different Ways to celebrate Christmas-Comparing Christmas Traditions Across the Globe

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Christmas caroling, gingerbread houses, eggnog and candy canes are an indication that the holiday season is upon us. In the U.S. and certain other countries, we have traditions like setting out milk and cookies for Santa, lining our mantels with stockings, and hanging wreaths and bright lights outside. But many other countries around the world have their own unique traditions to celebrate this most wonderful time of the year. Let’s take a look at some of the different ways other cultures embrace the magic of Christmas. 

Region of Puerto Rico 

In Puerto Rico, Christmas is an extravagant, go-all-out type of holiday. Christmas celebrations start the day after Thanksgiving and last until the beginning of January. An important holiday tradition is caroling, referred to as a parranda, meaning the gift of music. The parranda isn’t your average Christmas caroling excursion; there are maracas, guitars and tamboras involved, making it all the more festive. In many cities, fireworks are set off each night in celebration. Some special holiday foods in Puerto Rico include lechón asado (a pork dish), tembleque (coconut pudding), and coquito (a coconut-rum drink).

Australia

Christmas is a holiday that is typically associated with winter. But in Australia, Christmas takes place in the summer season, swapping snowmen for sandmen. The beach is a very popular destination on Christmas day, filled with live music, barbeques, and decorated trees in the sand. If you’re lucky, you may even see Santa Claus, better known as Father Christmas in Australia, surfing the waves. Australians also celebrate the holiday season by gathering in large groups to sing Christmas carols with candles in hand. This tradition is known as ‘Carols by Candlelight.’

Finland

Rovaniemi, located in Lapland, Finland, is a city noted for its holiday spirit. In fact, Rovaniemi is the official hometown of Santa Claus. Santa’s post office (it’s a real post office) is open year-round, collecting letters from thousands of children. The subpolar climate of Rovaniemi makes the city a winter wonderland for several months. Christmas theme parks filled with reindeer sleigh rides and Santa and his elves make for a wonderful holiday experience.

Mexico

In Mexico, the Las Posadas celebration begins on December 16th and ends on Christmas Eve. Communities dress up and reenact Joseph and Mary’s journey to Bethlehem in search of shelter. There’s music, parties, and holiday foods such as buñuelos, a dessert made of fried dough and topped with cinnamon sugar or syrup. On Christmas Eve, the party culminates with the breaking of piñatas.

A tree ornament in the form of a globe.
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Germany

Germany has a rich history of Christmas traditions, some more terrifying than others. In Germany and some other European countries, the Krampus, an evil demon-goat creature, is rumored to be Santa’s evil relative. Krampus punishes children who misbehave, and if you’re in Germany, you may see people dressed up as Krampus wandering through the streets and scaring bystanders. On a happier note, Christmas markets and holiday shopping are all the rage in Germany. In the city of Nuremberg, Christkindlesmarkt is a famously large Christmas market, attracting millions of visitors each year. Famous holiday foods at this market include gingerbread, bratwursts, and fruitcake. 

Japan

Although only a small fraction of the population of Japan is Christian, the spirit of Christmas is still in the air. In Japan, millions of families celebrate Christmas with a special tradition: a chicken dinner, typically from KFC. Santa Claus has been traded in for Colonel Sanders. In some ways, Christmas in Japan is celebrated in the same way that we celebrate Valentine’s Day. Rather than spending Christmas day with family, couples go out for romantic dinners. 

Netherlands

In Amsterdam, Santa Claus is not the only one to deliver presents — Sinterklaas, a Santa-like Nordic figure, also distributes gifts to children. Sinterklass sails from Spain over to the Netherlands to deliver presents on December 5. Santa then arrives on Christmas day to fill childrens’ shoes with gifts. Another important Christmas tradition in the Netherlands is gourmetten, a big dinner where meats and vegetables are grilled at the table, and underneath the grill or hot plate, tiny pans filled with sauces and cheeses are broiled. These dinners somewhat resemble an indoor barbeque.

Iceland

In Iceland, the Yule Lads, 13 mischievous troll-like figures, deliver gifts to children or give them potatoes if they have been naughty that year. Starting on December 12th, a different lad visits each night leading up to Christmas. Children leave their shoes out on windowsills in anticipation of the Yule Lads’ visits. Grýla, the mother of the Yule Lads, is a scary troll rumored to eat misbehaving children. 

While many Christmas celebrations and family traditions are on hold due to Covid, it’s always nice to reminisce on the pre-Covid holiday seasons, as we hope to resume the celebrations next year.

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